Malawi

International Center of Excellence for Malaria Research

Despite international efforts and widespread, malaria remains entrenched in some highly endemic parts of the world. This project unites field epidemiology, population surveys, entomological studies, and advanced molecular laboratory techniques to understand the role of human community reservoirs, particularly those that have asymptomatic and/or submicroscopic infections, in perpetuating parasite transmission.

Research Focus

  • Epidemiology

    At the EIGH, our researchers use epidemiology to understand the distribution and determinants of the health and disease conditions in specific populations, and to identify risk factors for certain diseases. This allows them to develop, implement, and measure the impact of targeted, preventative healthcare methods. 

  • Infectious Diseases

    At the EIGH, our researchers work to combat a number of various illnesses, including infectious diseases caused by organisms like bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. These diseases can also be spread from one person to another and may be transmitted from animals to humans. 

  • Vector-borne Diseases

    Vector-borne disease research is a historic strength of the EIGH. Our researchers study multiple parts of the vector-borne disease lifecycle, such as how the parasites, viruses, and bacteria cause these kinds of diseases, how the vectors spread these diseases, and how to improve prevention methods in tropical and subtropical areas, which have the highest burden of vector-borne illnesses. 

Who’s Involved

EIGH Faculty

Global Partners

  • Michigan State University 
  • University of Malawi College of Medicine / Blantyre Malaria Project
  • University of Maryland Baltimore
  • University of Michigan

 

Additional Information

Publications

Vareta J, Buchwald AG, Barrall A, Cohee LM, Walldorf JA, Coalson JE, Seydel K, Sixpence A, Mathanga DP, Taylor TE, Laufer MK. Submicroscopic malaria infection is not associated with fever in cross-sectional studies in Malawi. Malaria Journal. 2020;19(1):233.

Andronescu LR, Buchwald AG, Coalson JE, Cohee L, Bauleni A, Walldorf JA, Kandangwe C, Mzilahowa T, Taylor TE, Mathanga DP, Laufer MK. Net age, but not integrity, may be associated with decreased protection against Plasmodium falciparum infection in southern Malawi. Malaria Journal. 2019 Sep 24;18(1):329.

Coalson JE, Cohee LM, Walldorf JA, Bauleni A, Mathanga DP, Taylor TE, Wilson ML, Laufer MK. Challenges in treatment for fever among school-age children and adults in Malawi. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2019 Feb;100(2):287-295.

Coalson JE, Cohee LM, Buchwald AG, Nyambalo A, Kubale J, Seydel KB, Mathanga D, Taylor TE, Laufer MK, Wilson ML. Simulation models predict that school-age children are responsible for most human-to-mosquito Plasmodium falciparum transmission in southern Malawi. Malaria Journal. 2018 Apr 3;17(1):147.

Buchwald AG, Coalson JE, Cohee LM, Walldorf JA, Chimbiya N, Bauleni A, Nkanaunena K, Ngwira A, Sorkin JD, Mathanga DP, Taylor TE, Laufer MK. Insecticide-treated net
effectiveness at preventing Plasmodium falciparum infection varies by age and season. Malaria Journal. 2017 Jan 17;16(1):32.

Buchwald AG, Walldorf JA, Cohee LM, Coalson JE, Chimbiya N, Bauleni A, Nkanaunena K, Ngwira A, Kapito-Tembo A, Mathanga DP, Taylor TE, Laufer MK. Bed net use among school-aged children after a universal bed net campaign in Malawi. Malaria Journal. 2016 Feb 29;15(1):127.

Coalson JE, Walldorf JA, Cohee LM, Ismail MD, Mathanga D, Cordy RJ, Marti M, Taylor TE, Seydel KB, Laufer MK, Wilson ML. High prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte infections in school-age children using sensitive molecular detection: Patterns and predictors of risk from a cross-sectional study in southern Malawi. Malaria Journal. 2016 Nov 4;15(1):527.

Walldorf JA, Cohee LM, Coalson JE, Bauleni A, Nkanaunena K, Kapito-Tembo A, Seydel KB, Ali D, Mathanga D, Taylor TE, Valim C, Laufer MK. School-age children are a reservoir of malaria infection in Malawi. PLoS One. 2015 Jul 24;10(7):e0134061.

 

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